2017 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER SPORT 2.0 SUV

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  • Year:2017
  • Make:Mitsubishi
  • Model:Outlander Sport
  • Trim:2.0 ES
  • Bodystyle:SUV
  • Doors:4 door
  • Engine:2.0L I-4 cyl
  • Drive Line:Front-wheel Drive
  • Fuel Type:Regular Unleaded
  • Exterior Color:Rally Red
  • Interior Color:Gray
  • VIN:JA4AP3AU5HZ003965
  • Model Code:OS45-A
  • Stock #:63544

FUEL EFFICIENCY RATING

City MPG:
23
Hwy MPG:
29

Actual rating will vary with options, driving conditions, habits and vehicle condition.

$22,890 MSRP

$2,000 Incentive

$20,890 BASIN PRICE

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Checking Blind Spots

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A blind spot is an area around a vehicle that the driver cannot directly see in their normal field of vision whilst driving.

Blind spots occur in various types of vehicles including trucks and cars. Motorcycles do not have blind spots as they have full visibility around the bike.

There are numerous areas in a vehicle that can create a blind spot for the driver. Some blind spots can be from the windscreen pillar, rear view mirror, passengers, headrests, side mirrors or cargo being transported.

There are many accidents that occur because someone just didn’t see the other person and it’s likely they were in the blind spot.

It is important to identify where blind spots are in your car and to make an effort to check your blind spots by moving your head to enable a visual of those areas.

You should also identify potential blind spots on other vehicles and make sure you don’t sit too long in a blind spot to ensure you are being seen.

Take the time to set your driving position and mirrors correctly to assist in eliminating any unnecessary blind spots.

Once you have your mirrors set up you may want to get someone to walk around your car so you can identify what areas are obstructed from your view and manoeuvre yourself until you can see.

This way you will know where the blind spots are and what you will need to do to be able to view that area if needed.

When purchasing a new car it’s a good idea to just sit in the driver’s seat and consider the visibility.

We all come in different shapes and forms so what might work well for one person may not work for another.

Convertibles are well known for having poor visibility due to the construction of the vehicle.

But with the top down rear visibility behind the driver increases. When you sit in a potential new purchase and don’t feel confident in being able to see around the vehicle then you are probably best to keep looking.

If you can’t see properly there will be a higher chance of accidents and your comfort level in that vehicle may be diminished.

Here are some things to consider with blind spots:

  • Size of the rear window
  • How high do you sit in the seat and where is your eye level
  • Can you see over your shoulders on both sides?
  • How wide are the pillars?
  • How much can you see in the side mirrors?

Keep in mind that bigger vehicles have larger blind spots so when negotiating around heavy vehicles or larger cars be mindful of the blind spots so you do not put yourself in danger.

Also, as a pedestrian be aware that you may be standing in a blind spot and the driver can’t see you.

Outside factors may also influence your visibility, for example you might not be able to see ahead of you because the sun is shining straight into your view.

If you are unable to view the road ahead of you then slow down to ensure you can stop in time if required.

Be aware, be prepared and know what to watch out for so you don’t end up being that person who says “I’m so sorry, I didn’t see you.”

WE PROVIDE FAST AND AFFORDABLE AUTO REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE TO MIDLAND, TX DRIVERS

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Here at Basin Mitsubishi, we strive to be the automotive home of drivers throughout Odessa, Andrews, Big Spring, Midland, TX and Hobbs, NM. For that reason, we not only sell high-quality cars, but provide auto repair and maintenance through our Service Center!

We invite you stop by our Service Center to take advantage of our many years of automotive expertise. We’re staffed with a team of expert technicians that are equipped to provide major repairs and maintenance services such as oil and filter changes, engine tune-ups, brake adjustments, tire rotations, state inspections and much more!

With the care of our skilled technicians, we’ll return your new or used vehicle to its like-new condition in no time at all! Of course, you don’t want to leave your car with just any mechanic when our trusted technicians have been trained to work with your specific Mitsubishi model.

We know that regularly-scheduled maintenance is simply the best way to ensure that your car retains its original quality throughout many happy years behind the wheel!  Before visiting dealership, you’ll want to browse our monthly Service Specials to enjoy discount pricing on many of our services!

Most importantly, you’ll enjoy the confidence of knowing that your vehicle is in the hands of a trustworthy dealership like ours!

Ready to take advantage of our services? Then, simply schedule your next service appointment online and bring your car down to our Service Center in Midland, TX. We’ll take care of the rest!

Leasing vs Buying a Car

images.jpg Buying Leasing
Ownership You own the vehicle and get to keep it as long as you want it. You don’t own the vehicle. You get to use it but must return it at the end of the lease unless you decide to buy it.
Up-front costs They include the cash price or a down payment, taxes, registration and other fees. They typically include the first month’s payment, a refundable security deposit, a down payment, taxes, registration and other fees.
Monthly payments Loan payments are usually higher than lease payments because you’re paying off the entire purchase price of the vehicle, plus interest and other finance charges, taxes, and fees. Lease payments are almost always lower than loan payments because you’re paying only for the vehicle’s depreciation during the lease term, plus interest charges (called rent charges), taxes, and fees.
Early termination You can sell or trade in your vehicle at any time. If necessary, money from the sale can be used to pay off any loan balance. If you end the lease early, early-termination charges can be almost as costly as sticking with the contract.
Vehicle return You’ll have to deal with selling or trading in your car when you decide you want a different one. You can return the vehicle at lease-end, pay any end-of-lease costs, and walk away.
Future value The vehicle will depreciate but its cash value is yours to use as you like. On the plus side, its future value doesn’t affect you financially. On the negative side, you don’t have any equity in the vehicle.
Mileage You’re free to drive as many miles as you want. (But higher mileage lowers the vehicle’s trade-in or resale value.) Most leases limit the number of miles you may drive, often 12,000 to 15,000 per year. (You can negotiate a higher mileage limit.) You’ll have to pay charges for exceeding your limits.
Excessive wear and tear You don’t have to worry about wear and tear, but it could lower the vehicle’s trade-in or resale value. Most leases hold you responsible. You’ll have to pay extra charges for exceeding what is considered normal wear and tear.
End of term At the end of the loan term (typically four to five years), you have no further payments and you have built equity to help pay for your next vehicle. At the end of the lease (typically two to four years), you’ll have to finance the purchase of the car or lease or buy another.
Customizing The vehicle is yours to modify or customize as you like. Because the lessor wants the vehicle returned in sellable condition, any modifications or custom parts you add will need to be removed before you return the car. If there is any residual damage, you’ll have to pay to have it fixed.

Lancer Evolution X Performance

2015 Lancer Evolution aluminum front fenders and hood

ALUMINUM FRONT FENDERS AND HOOD

Consisting of aluminum front fenders with air outlets, an aluminum hood with air vents and an aluminum roof panel, these strong yet lightweight body panels lower both the Lancer Evolution’s body weight and its center of gravity for improved weight distribution, balance and handling. Plus, the vented hood and front fenders work together to pull heat from the engine compartment, which optimizes cooling and performance. So they not only look cool, they help the Evolution keep its cool-even in the most demanding conditions.

2015 Lancer Evolution active yaw control

ACTIVE YAW CONTROL

Active Yaw Control (AYC) varies engine torque between the left and right rear wheels to give the Lancer Evolution precise traction and handling in just about any condition. Utilizing numerous vehicle sensors to detect cornering speed, lateral acceleration, steering angle and more, AYC instantly directs torque to the rear wheels with the most traction at any given moment for unparalleled cornering, acceleration, performance and control.

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2.0L TURBOCHARGED MIVEC ENGINE

Combining a 2.0-liter all-aluminum block and head with a powerful turbocharger and advanced MIVEC technology, the Lancer Evolution boasts 291 horsepower – 303 hp on the Final Edition – and the kind of performance that eats bigger, thirstier V6s for breakfast.

2015 Lancer Evolution dynamic and responsive handling

RESPONSIVE SPORT-TUNED HANDLING

The true test of any performance car is how it feels in the corners. From track-inspired rack-and-pinion steering to available Eibach® springs and Blistein® shocks to a fine-tuned MacPherson strut front- and multi-link rear suspension, the Lancer Evolution sets a new standard for stock performance.

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TWIN CLUTCH SST TRANSMISSION

Twin Clutch Sportronic® Shift Transmission provides connectivity and the power efficiency of a manual gearbox along with remarkably smooth, quick automatic shifting. Choose from Normal, Sport or S-Sport or take full control using the sequential shifter or paddle shifters. Lancer Evolution MR only.

How to Deal with Foggy Windows

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No matter what the climate is like where you live, keeping the temperature comfortable inside your car often means battling foggy windows. If you live in a climate with cold winters, staying warm in your chilly car means turning on the heater — and battling the resultant fog on the inside of your windows. In warm, humid areas, turning on the AC can cause the opposite issue — fog blurring your windows from the outside.

The reason for foggy windows has to do with temperature and the air’s moisture content. On a cold day, any moisture in the air inside your car — from passengers exhaling, from snow on your boots, etc. — turns to condensation when it hits air next to the windows that’s below a certain temperature, called the dew point. The condensation is what makes your car’s windows appear foggy. On a hot, humid day, the opposite happens, when the muggy air outside your car reaches the dew point against your windshield after it’s cooled by your AC system.

Whether the fog is on the inside or the outside of your windows, any time you can’t see clearly in all directions, it’s dangerous. So, it’s important to know how to make sure your windows are clear — no matter the weather.

When It’s Colder Outside Than Inside Your Car…

When you’re dealing with cold weather outside and you turn on the heater inside your car, the fog typically will start to form on the inside of your car windows. Here are some options to clear those windows up:

  • For a quick fix: Lower the temperature inside your car rapidly by turning on the defrost vent with cool air or cracking a window; don’t turn on the heat. This will make the inside of your car cooler and help reduce the fog. Also, turn on your car’s rear-window defogger to help clear up the back window. Though this is a fast and effective method, it could leave you shivering.
  • For a more comfortable solution: Lifehacker advises those who want to be snug and warm whileCar-Recirculation-Thinkstock driving to turn on the defroster and blow warm air across the windshield to evaporate the accumulating moisture. If your vehicle’s ventilation system has a recirculate feature, turn it off. When this feature is on, your car’s heat or AC reuses the air inside the car, instead of continually pulling in air from outside.  If you’re trying to defog the windows in cold weather, you want your car to continually take in the dry air. (Not sure if your car has recirculation? Look for a button on the dashboard that has an arrow going in a circle or a semi-circle. Sometimes, it will feature an icon of a car with this type of arrow inside it.)
  • Plan ahead: Keep your car glass as clean as possible — on the inside and the outside. That way, when your glass fogs up, you know the problem isn’t just a dirty windshield. You may also want to think about using a product that you can spray or wipe onto the inside of your windows in order to help prevent fog from forming.

When It’s Warmer Outside than In Your Car…

When the temperature and moisture level outside are greater than inside the car, moisture will condense on the exterior of the car glass. In this situation, the trick is to increase the temperature on the inside of the car to accumulate less moisture on the outside. Keep the following tips in mind:

  • For a quick fix: Use your windshield wipers. This will help get rid of the condensation until you’ve balanced out the temperature.
  • Warm up your car: Turn down the AC to the lowest (least-cool) setting to increase the temperature without it becoming too uncomfortable. If this doesn’t work, turn the AC off completely.
  • Leave recirculation off: As stated above, it’s a good idea to turn off your car’s recirculation feature to battle foggy windows, so the temperature and moisture levels in your car begin to equalize with those outside.

Trying to see through fogged-up windows is a driving hazard, but with these tips, you can help increase your driving safety—no matter what the weather.

Gas Tanks: Why Aren’t All Fuel Doors on the Same Side?

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Quick: On which side is your vehicle’s fuel door?

Must you look at the little diamond-shaped arrow on the fuel gauge EVERY time you fill up to know which side holds the fuel filler? Have you ever pulled to the fuel island to discover you’re on the wrong side? Did you utter bad words before or after you said, “Why don’t they put fuel doors on the same side of every car?!?”

The answer to that question is complicated, if not convoluted.

Based on my research into the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, I came to the conclusion (a conclusion later supported by my contacts at both the Ford Motor Company and Nissan North America) that no U.S. government regulation concerns which side on which the fuel door must be positioned. Much to the chagrin of many motorists, the fuel door can be on either side.

With no legal or marketing motivation, and scant ownership enjoyment implications, car-company engineers are free to place fuel doors on whichever side offers the easiest packaging, according to Ford spokesman Mark Schirmer. He added that there’s not enough room — and no demand — for dual fuel doors.

Preference

Americans prefer left-mounted fuel doors, said Schirmer, referencing a Ford study. A driver’s-side fuel door makes it easier for drivers to place the car’s left fender close to fuel pump. Still, fuel door location is typically not part of the buying decision, added Schirmer.

Those in Japan, India, the United Kingdom, Australia, Hong Kong, New Zealand, and countries in southern Africa drive on the left side of the road and sit on the right side of the car, and it appears they prefer right-mounted fuel doors, given the tendencies of cra manufacturers. For at least 25 years, the conventional wisdom among auto writers has been that Europeans like right-side doors. However, when I posed this to my industry co-horts, no car company would speculate if or why that might be true.

Nissan, like most automakers, produces some vehicles with left fuel doors and some with right doors.

Reasons

“The placement of the fuel door is mainly a factor of fuel tank design, location and underbody packaging,” Nissan’s Steve Yaeger wrote in an email. “With all of the structure and components located underneath the vehicle, (engineers) would quickly encounter restrictions in trying to route the filler tube to the same side on every vehicle.”

If mechanisms such as a “big, honkin’ speaker” must be placed on the left side, engineers put the fuel door on the right, notes Schirmer.

The bottom line: Fuel door position is not a random choice, but if engineers have a good reason to place fuel doors on the right, that’s where they go.

If you can’t remember the location of your fuel door, don’t be ashamed to look at the little diamond-arrow on your fuel gauge … BEFORE you pull up to the pump.